Tag Archives: waterfront

Sister Facility in Campbell River Vancouver Island, BC

Amazing and weird to have stumbled on another facility so similar to the proposed Discovery Center Community Pier! A Maritime Heritage Center, public fishing pier (actually named Discovery Pier) and an aquarium. All projects of the local Rotary Club, making much out of surplus and ignored city-owned property. Click here to check out their website and read their story:

From an undistinguished piece of land to a showplace for Campbell River, the Maritime Heritage Centre has had a remarkable evolution.

The Maritime Heritage Centre project began in 1998 when the District of Campbell River (now the City of Campbell River) solicited ideas for potential uses for the land near the Discovery Pier.  The land had previously been the site of the old sewage treatment plant, since upgraded and relocated to an area north of town.

The Campbell River Daybreak Rotarians proposed that a maritime heritage type centre be built to showcase the history of the local coastal waters and their links to the community.  The City approved the concept and the Rotarians, through a separate society, built the Maritime Heritage Centre.  The completed centre was turned over to the City, and the Maritime Heritage Society now operates it.

The transformation of the site rid it of the stigma attached to its prior use.

Building the Maritime Heritage Centre was a Community Service Project of mammoth proportions for the Daybreak Rotary Club, with an impact on Campbell River for years to come.  The Centre is not considered a Museum, but rather an activity centre, containing facilities for education, research, exhibitions and social engagements – and most importantly, the reconstruction and housing of the BCP45 fishing seiner that once adorned the back of the Canadian five dollar bill.

This facility is a marvelous example of how a community and government can work together to make a beautiful, useful and functional facility which even today, continues to grow and improve.

 

White Paper on Water and Michigan’s Economy

blue economy

This report validates the Discovery Center proposal for public use of the former coal dock and is worth reading. Michigan Economic Center Report: Water, Michigan and the Blue Economy (download here). In this new report we define the ‘Blue Economy’ as the way Michigan’s natural water assets, and water education, research and technology innovation creates jobs and contributes to economic growth.  The report is a baseline inventory of Michigan’s blue economy activity and conservatively estimates nearly one million Michigan jobs, and $60 billion in annual economic impact, linked to Michigan’s water assets and water innovation abilities. The report was commissioned by the Governor’s Office of the Great Lakes to inform a developing state water strategy, and as a first step context-setter for the project “Growing Michigan’s Blue Economy”, supported by the C.S. Mott Foundation, designed to  accelerate the growth of  Michigan’s Blue Economy.  I hope you will share this report with others, and are happy to answer questions. For more information go to www.mieconomiccenter.org, or contact me at the number and email below.  John Austin Director, Michigan Economic Center Nonresident Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution President, Michigan State Board of Education jcaustin@umich.edu 734.474.3110 @John_C_Austin

Editorial: Public must have major say in coal docks future

Click here to view the Record Eagle April 13, 2013 Editorial: Public must have major say in coal docks future.

The Discovery Center’s proposal for a Community Pier, Harbor and Marina is on the City Commission’s April 21 Agenda.

Rotary’s Thoughts on the Region’s Waterfront

At the February 13th joint study session with Traverse City Light & Power and the City of Traverse City, Marsha Smith of Rotary got up and made a very well-reasoned argument for the process and criteria that the City should use for disposing of surplus property. Her memo in support of her public comments can be found here: Rotary Memo regarding Surplus Property.

She made the following especially compelling argument:

For over 50 years the City of Traverse City has listened to the citizens and worked systematically to open our bay front for public use. This thoughtful and visionary framework has led to a world class waterfront that is accessible to all, regardless of economic status or physical ability. It has been the catalyst for adjoining units of government in Acme and Elmwood Townships to do the same.

Honestly, why would the City choose to reverse that trend now?

USCE DCGL Oblique