Tag Archives: port of call

Could We See This Cruise Ship at the Community Pier in the Future?

St LaurentA new Great Lakes Cruise Ship will begin plying the Great Lakes waters in 2015. The proposed Discovery Community Pier could be the port of call that cruise ships like this need so passengers can conveniently disembark and tour our area.

The Saint Laurent, measuring 286 feet long and with a draft of 13 and half feet, features 105 luxury staterooms, says Great Lakes Cruise Company. Learn more….

It was specially designed for cruising the Great Lakes and can travel at a speed of up to 12 knots.

 

Editorial: Public must have major say in coal docks future

Click here to view the Record Eagle April 13, 2013 Editorial: Public must have major say in coal docks future.

The Discovery Center’s proposal for a Community Pier, Harbor and Marina is on the City Commission’s April 21 Agenda.

No Negative Impact to TCLP Action at April 8 Board Meeting

Going into tonight’s meeting, the perception and fear was that the property would transfer to the City upon the motion being presented. While the motion passed, what we learned and heard at the meeting is that this was really only a motion to approve the transfer, whereupon the City Commission will initiate a public process to fully investigate all the issues, risks, opportunities and options regarding the Discovery Center Proposal and the property itself. But, no deed will be signed and no transfer made until the City, upon conclusion of the process and careful, thoughtful deliberation, makes a final decision as to the future of the coal dock and then passes a resolution to either accept the transfer of property or dispose of the property in some other manner. Once the two bodies agree, only then will transfer to any entity occur. TCLP will continue to own, maintain and manage the property in the meantime.

Given the repeated assurances during the meeting of Mayor Michael Estes, City Manager Jered Ottenwess, Commissioners Barbara Budros and Jim Carruthers that our proposal would be given fair, open and public consideration, along with statements of personal support for our proposal from them and most of the TCLP board members, I am personally at peace that we can trust them all to give this amazing concept, supported by so many in our community, a fair chance to become reality. It will not happen quickly, nor should it. What we have conceived needs to be understood, supported and accepted by the community at large.

There was great angst, fear and mistrust leading up to tonight’s meeting and I accept responsibility for much of that. There was a lot of time spent and much discussion fueled by this proposed action, which resulted in good discourse amongst all the parties and no adverse action. In the end, it may have galvanized our resolve to do good for the community and an appreciation for the roles we all play.

So, my personal Thank You to the TCLP Board Members and City Commissioners who graciously bore up under the pressure and managed to navigate a delicate situation honorably and respectfully. And a Thank You as well to all the individuals and organizations who spent their valuable time to support this great vision. My enthusiasm for the project and confidence that the good vision we have will become reality is undiminished.

We all want what is best for the community, so let the discussion begin!  Next stop, April 21 presentation to City Commission.

Mike Wills, Chair

Who profits if the Discovery Pier, Harbor and Marina happens?

No individual or private entity profits. The Discovery Center (a 501 (c) 3 non-profit entity) will be the operator of the Community Pier, Harbor and Marina taking all the financial risks and rewards to sustain the Phase 2 Discovery Center facilities and further its mission and those of its member non-profits. Generating an on-going revenue stream from related business ventures (referred to as a “Social Enterprise”) is an established practice for stabilizing funding for non-profit organization rather than relying solely on fundraising and donations. Conceptually, the market-rate rental slips will cover the non-profit aspects of the Community Harbor and generate about $80,000 a year, after all expenses and debt reduction, toward the operation of the Discovery Center. The State of Michigan will be paid about $25,000 a year for the bottomlands lease and the private property owners will be paid rent in roughly an equivalent amount for the use of their riparian shoreline and sharing their parking. However, they will not participate in any profits.

How do we know that the Discovery Center ~ Great Lakes has the capacity to handle and manage the Community Harbor & Pier?

The Discovery Center itself is a Rotary project: in 2006, Mike Dow donated the property (valued at $1.5 M) for the express purpose of creating a water-related nonprofit place of exploration, learning, and awareness, to Rotary Camps & Services, the land-holding arm of Rotary. The Discovery Center has a framework for managing the property, a sitting Board of Directors, a vision, and a plan for the future as a premier educational, recreational, and cultural attraction. The Community Pier and Harbor project has the full support of the Rotary Club of Traverse City. Rotary Charities has made major investments to insure the success of the Discovery Center. Rotary’s participation in the project lends it the credibility, weight, and experience of the Club’s service to the community for more than 95 years. Rotary is the logical owner and steward of the property, having demonstrated its commitment and success in managing property (over 1800 acres) for the greater public good. Some examples: State Theater, Park Place Hotel, Boy and Girl Scout Camps and large tracts of protected natural areas. Rotary has also incubated and contributed to many other local public projects, including the City’s bay front plan.

TCLP is owned by the City, so shouldn’t the City be the sole beneficiary of any value attributable to the former coal dock property?

Elmwood Township hosted this industrial use and has suffered the blight, traffic, and coal dust for more than 40 years without even the benefit of property taxes, while the City gets 5% ($1.6M in 2012) of the TCLP gross revenues. With this plan, Elmwood will once again benefit the Citizens of Traverse City through this facility in a very different and exciting way. TCLP has an opportunity to contribute to the change Elmwood is working toward.

Wouldn’t Elmwood Township be the major beneficiary of the Community Pier, Harbor & Marina?

Our economy is regional; it does not respect jurisdictional boundaries. Restaurants, hotels, and retailers in downtown Traverse City gain with every dollar spent in the region. Citizens of Traverse City will benefit from increased economic activity generated by greater public access and water related pursuits. Visitors and Citizens of Traverse City and the entire Northwest Region already use the fabulous new Greilickville Harbor Park and will no doubt make use of the Community Pier and Harbor.

If TCLP no longer has a need for the coal dock, why not just transfer it to the City and let the City decide what to do with it?

A transfer from TCLP to the City would restrict or limit many legal options (such as leases, use agreements, or transfer to other entities) since the City is bound by more restrictive statutes and charter provisions than a municipal utility. TCLP/City have no plans to use the dock; the Discovery Center plan is well developed and ready to go. This public asset has been sitting unused for a decade already.

Why would some think tranferring the pier to an indepentdent enity would be giving away a valuable public asset?

By dedicating the dock as a Community Pier and Harbor, the property will not be given away; it will simply be transferred to an independent entity which will be responsible for managing it in a manner that will dramatically increase the value of this property for the community by providing public access to an asset already publicly owned. The true measure of the value of this public asset is its benefit to the community and its impact on the greater good for our region. It is not necessary that TCLP or the City own the property for it to serve the public. Another entity can hold and manage the property.

What is the difference between the proposed Community Harbor & the Community Marina?

 

The Community Harbor and Pier will be a public open space created as an attraction to the residents of and visitors to our region. While there will likely be some fee-based activities in the Harbor (charters, boat tours, etc.), the space itself will be free and open to everyone. The Marina will contain private seasonal boat slips. The Community Harbor and Pier will be created on the public property currently owned by TCLP. The Marina will be connected to private property owned by neighboring properties to the south. While integrated into a single project, the private Marina does not utilize the TCLP property.